Collaboration = Convergence of Ideas

I have written about Convergence before. It’s a 2-day professional development conference sponsored by my current school district, Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS). The name is not happenstance.

Dictionary.com defines the act of converging as meeting “in a point or line; inclin[ing] towards each other, as lines that are not parallel.”   WCPSS Convergence brings together library media and technology teachers across the vast school system to share with and learn from each other. It is clear Spring Convergence 2017 is focused on collaboration.

Almost every session I attended today used collaboration as its core whether the collaboration was virtual (Google Drive & Classroom) or the keynote address by Chris Barton and Don Tate about their collaborative efforts in creating the book Whoosh! Lonnie Johnson’s Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions.

I, too, presented about collaboration with my “batty” partner-in-crime, Krista Brinchek. Krista and I collaborated on a unit with 4th and 5th graders. Students learned about bat conversation and white nose syndrome in Science specials class with Mrs. Brinchek. In library, students learned how to conduct research, determine important information, cite resources, and use Google Classroom while researching general information about bats and their habitats. Our unit hit the next level when Christy Bigelow, technology teacher, incorporated 3-D modeling having students create 3-D models of bats using geometric shapes.

Today’s presentation, titled “Does Collaboration Make You ‘Batty’?” was fun to create and present because my collaborative partners make it so. We allow each other to dream an idea then help one another bring the idea to fruition. Part of today’s session allowed attendees the opportunity to think about and note drivers and barriers to collaboration. It is clear collaboration can happen within any organization if adults allow it.   Teachers are not silos. They work best in groups holding each other accountable and pushing one another outside of comfortable spaces. The session ended with an opportunity for attendees to share their successful collaboration stories. This was my chance to learn from those to whom I had been presenting. I now have ideas to implement!

As the name implies, I believe Convergence is about building relationships, trusting others, and bending my instruction to others’ best practices and successes. My presentation is linked here for you to view. If you have any collaboration ideas, and especially if you have success stories to share or how you overcame barriers, please share in the comments below. I want to continue my learning.

Photo credit:  @stacydarwin

Power of Connectivity: Parenting and Teaching

Sometimes confluences of ideas converge. This happened to me today while I attended a parenting workshop. Marbles Kids Museum hosts parent workshops in addition to all of the kid innovative and creative play times. Today, I began a Triple P seminar. This 3 session series focuses on The Power of Positive Parenting.

The series teaches parents on child development and what to expect of children at age milestones. Centering on positive discipline techniques and raising independent and resilient children, The Power of Positive Parenting empowers parents with child-centered approaches fostering effective parent-child relationships.

While listening, I could not overlook each strategy’s connectedness to Responsive Classroom (RC) and Positive Behavioral Intervention & Supports (PBIS). I have taught in RC schools and currently teach at a school using PBIS. Each program has differences but they have some common core principles. Explicitly teaching children appropriate behavioral expectations, practicing the expectations, and then holding children accountable creates positive experiences and equips children for better understanding of societal, classroom, and/or home norms. Setting and sticking to routines ensures children know what happens next providing a sense of security and independence. When a child errs, talking calmly and rationally with her/him about the mistake, which rule was broken, and what she/he should do instead fosters a sense of accountability rooted in love, compassion, and forgiveness.

I look forward to learning more in the next two seminars. I imagine I will see more similarities to RC and PBIS.

30 Day Challenge—Day 1: Start Blogging

By now, I hope it’s fairly evident that I intend to blog as a form of reflective writing. I always have good intentions to start this blog but I allow excuses for why I should not. Back in November 2016, my school district, Wake County Public School System, hosted its semi-annual Convergence conference. This conference is the district’s professional development for instructional technology and library media staff. Modeled after state and national technology conferences, Convergence hosts two days of congruent sessions bookended by keynote speakers. Each Convergence is structured through a theme. This most recent Convergence focused on innovation. Kevin Brookhouser and George Couros were the opening and closing keynote speakers respectively. Brookhouser* spoke about 20Time Project and Couros* The Innovator’s Mindset. Each keynote session was truly inspiring.

Each keynote speaker also let some congruent sessions. Due to timing of other sessions, I did not attend any of Mr. Brookhouser’s sessions. However, I did go to one of the three sessions Mr. Couros presented. It was on blogging as form of professional portfolios. I left the session knowing I needed to blog but not sure where or how to start. The session was both inspiring and overwhelming. Writing is fairly easy for me. As a librarian, organizing a blog is easy. But knowing what to say or if what I have to say makes a difference is more challenging for me. My understanding of Couros’ view of blogging is “you’re already doing this stuff inside and outside the classroom, just put it down in a digital footprint.”

Of course that is an overly simplistic view of his session and much more “plainly spoken” than what I took away from the session. Blogging is important. But more important than leaving a digital footprint is reflecting on my instructional practice. I believe that is the key to blogging as Couros sees it. As a National Board Certified Teacher (NBTC), I know how important reflection is on my daily instruction and student learning. I know why I must be systematic in my blogging. And I believe I put a lot of pressure on myself to make my blog/portfolio “good enough”.

In the past, and for the most part, I still do, I have viewed reflective writing as a dairy, as something for me to put my thoughts just for me. When writing for NBPTS (National Board for Professional Teaching Standards) and for graduate school, I framed my instructional reflections for a particular audience. Blog audiences are more varied. Am I writing for other teachers to learn from me? Am I writing in hopes of making connections and learning from others? Am I writing for future administrators as I advance my career? The answer is yes to all. So where do I start? I start by writing for myself. I apologize in advance if my writing takes a more direct or conversational tone at times. When I write for myself, I always read it aloud to myself as if I am presenting to an audience of one. I listen for the natural pauses and ponder when something profound is says. It may seem weird to some people, but I bet if you try it, you will understand why I do it. So this blog is for all the readers out there. But at the core, it is for me.

Because of the many audiences and because it’s for me, there are so many directions I can take this blog/portfolio. There are so many journeys I want to pursue over the next chapters of my career. But I need to start by first putting word to print. I need to make writing in this blog a habitual practice.

I decided to search for how to form a habit and came across this article. For me, it presents too many steps but I believe it’s designed for broad appeal. I have read and reread the ones I think are most applicable to this journey and me. Therefore, I’m committing to 30 days of daily blogging. Furthermore, I found a 30-day blogging challenge for teachers. I like its approach and guidance. I plan to use it as training wheels.

Day 1’s challenge is to write a goal for this school year. My goal for now is to blog as a form of reflection. I will do my best over the next 30 days to connect both the day’s writing challenge to my thoughts of a lesson or takeaway from something happening at school. But most importantly, I plan to write each day. For it to be a habit, I have to start. To make a digital footprint, I have to step. This is that starting step.

*Do yourself a BIG favor! Follow their blogs, Twitter feeds, thought patterns. These two are truly innovative and changing the way other’s view education in the modern era.

 

Snow Day Questions…So Many Questions (repost from 2016)

pic0035I need to be upfront at the beginning of this post.  I do not have answers or solutions.  I have questions—and lots of them.  By the end of this reflection, I doubt I will have answered my questions.  Rather, I need your insights.  Please comment and email your perspectives and experiences.  My blog is about learning after all.

So what are my questions?  They are about the virtual learning on snow days.  In mid-January 2016, the eastern portion of the United States experienced a massive snowstorm that left many school systems closed for upwards of a week.  Luckily, we were on the southern end of the storm and were only out of school for two days.  However, those two days hit right during the middle of the year and only three weeks after returning from winter break.  Teachers know how crucial this time is.  Students are showing growth and many formative assessments indicate directions for the 2nd half of the school year.  But this is winter after all, and El Nino or not, winter storms cut into learning.

School districts across the United States are embracing technology and finding ways to lessen the impact of school closings.  Many districts have begun to institute snow-learning days at home through “virtual school days” and snow day packets.  My questions relate to using online resources to continue learning outside of school.

Is it beneficial?  Truthfully, I cannot believe I am asking this question.  Yes, it’s beneficial.  Further exploratory learning, allowing students to be masters of their learning in a virtual setting, flipping the classroom, and online classrooms are trends that I believe are not only improving education but also teaching lifelong skills of collaboration and critical thinking.  Students are learning about life in the “real world”.  After all, I continue my work on snow days by sitting at the kitchen counter planning lessons, creating book lists, and participating in Twitter chats to just name a few. (As an aside, I want to give a quick shout out to #ncsnowchat for awesome pop-up professional development on snow days.) But for students who are excited about their snow day, are we taking away the “joy” of snow days to put focus on nonstop schooling?  Is that a bad thing or another way we are improving as a society embracing curiosity, exploration, and home:school connected learning?

So, if we embrace snow day “e-learning”, how do we proceed?  Many districts have taken to Twitter as a means.  Within my previous district, Arlington Public Schools in Virginia, many librarians have effectively utilized Twitter to sponsor snow day Twitter chats, virtual librarian access, and encouraging reading from their e-book collections.  During this past snow storm, APS teachers participated in a #APSchats focused on how teachers have continued students’ virtual learning during their extended snow days. This is certainly one way to go.  But can this be measured and are students able to show progress when participation is voluntary?

What about the great economic divide?  Who does virtual learning positively impact and are students most in need of continued growth able to participate in virtual learning.  I’ve only begun a cursory search—this is a topic that could be and is well studied—but I found a 2013report showing that in 2011, roughly 70% of the U.S. homes have Internet access with the Asian and Non-Hispanic White households having the greatest Internet access.  Only 58.3 and 56.9 of Hispanic and Black households respectively have Internet access.  Simple Internet searches reflect positive aspects to household Internet access.  So if we are offering virtual school on snow days those benefiting are the ones who already have benefit from Internet access.  Are we furthering the space between the have and have-nots?

What if we provide the technology?  In North Carolina, Transylvania County School System has given all 6th-12th graders laptops.  Teachers have set up continuous work, even on snow days.  The thought is school is still “in session” although at home therefore no make up days needed.  Teachers hold online hours when they are available through email, phone, and other means to help students with their work.  This is amazing! Much like the online professional development teachers participate, students are learning from a truly blended environment.

Snow days are great even if I complain about not wanting snow or a day out of school.  Encouraging virtual education is one of my passions.  Then, why am I pondering this virtual snow day trend?  Shouldn’t I be showcasing its boldness and need?  Maybe I am doing just that.

What about you?  What are your thoughts and experiences?  What resources are available to support this trend?

Snowflake image created by:
Moulton, Jim. pic0035.jpg. February 1, 2009. Pics4Learning. 11 Jan 2017

Welcome to my blog (again–repost from 2016)

Here is my first ever blog post from last year when I used blogspot.  Much, if not all, of it still applies today.  I am still new to my district.  I continue to recreate everything.  But each day, I feel stronger.  Enjoy!

Welcome to my blog.  My hope is that I can provide you with a little inspiration, a little amusement, and some insight into my thoughts and actions as an educator.  Before I get too far ahead, let me introduce myself.   I am a veteran (some say seasoned) teacher working for the last 16 years as school librarian, classroom teacher, and teacher leader.  I am well credentialed but I believe it’s the daily experiences and reflections that truly shape my instruction.

Summer 2015, my family moved states.  After being at the same school for the last 10 years, I find myself in a new state, new district, new curriculum, and new library.  I say new because not only is it all new to me, the school building itself is new.  The school opened August 2015.  Being at a brand new school is exciting.  Everything is fresh.  Everything is shiny.  Everything is being created!

While I have experience creating and transforming classrooms and libraries, I have never opened a new space before.  So I find myself not just a veteran but also brand new.  In many ways, I feel more vulnerable and unsure of my librarianship this year, than I did my first year out of school.  Back then, I was new, naïve, and felt I could do almost anything.  Now, I know my limitations yet have that desire to be bold and naïve once again.

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This blog is first and foremost for me.  As you read and follow, should you do so, I hope you find something for you.  But if not, know that I am writing not only to provide you with new knowledge but provide me with clarity.  In some ways, this is a personal diary and should be written in private.  Yet, when I read others’ thoughts and experiences, I tend to find one nugget I can use or store away as “food for thought”.  Hopefully, you will find your nugget.

Much as an early Twitter user who follows and sometimes retweets, I am an early blogger.  The Internet is a vast storehouse of information.  Some information is important and some seemingly random and unnecessary.  My posts may often fall into the unnecessary column for your professional learning.  Know that for me this blog is furthering my professional learning.  Not only reflective, it will provide me a place to look back and see what I have done, what I thought, and why I made decisions.  As I stated earlier, I feel much like a new librarian this year.  Through my writing, I plan to learn and grow.  As a reader, and commenter, you will help with my growth.

Welcome to the new site

My blog is back up and running and on a new site. New Adventures of an Old Librarian

Hello and welcome to the new site rickydhamilton.com.  Last year, I started a blog on blogspot and enjoyed when I wrote.  But, I rarely gave myself time to do it.  After a few weeks of not posting, I thought, “Why bother?  No one is reading anymore anyway.”  But November 2016, I was fortunate enough to sit in a conference session by the one and only (and totally amazing…I’m geeking out here, just so you know) George Couros.  The session focused on blogging as form of professional portfolio.

This session challenged me in a way I had not anticipated.  Honestly, I thought I would enjoy hearing from him.  I have followed him on Twitter for years. I truly was going to the session as a fan an less as a learner.  Now before you skewer me for attending a conference and not opening myself as a learner please understand I value cognitive breaks.  As a teacher and librarian, I am focuseimg_0510d on instructing all day.  My learning muscles are not as sharp as they were when I spent my whole day in school as a learner.  So after attending a previous full day of attending sessions, taking notes, and devouring as much learning as possible, by day two I was a bit tired.  But I entered a packed room and found one empty chair I rushed to claim as mine so I could sit and be mesmerized by an edchat guru.

Instead of being mesmerized by his knowledge, I was dumbfounded by my lack of blogging; my lack of reflective writing; my lack of proving my passion.  I left his session wanting and needing to write.  But I did not.  I have sat on this for upwards of two months.

Why?  Because I was not ready.  Why? Because I was holding myself back.  Why? Because I felt inferior to those around me.  I allowed myself to forget how to correctly #failforward. And I have felt ashamed because I have kept myself from stepping out on a limb.  If I truly believe and want and demand that my students take risks, I have to as well.  So, here it is.  I’m back baby!  I have a lot to say and I hope others will learn from it.  But more importantly, I hope others will continue to push me, challenge me, and help teach me so I can continue to grow as a learner.

The next few posts are copies of the 4 posts from blogspot.  If you have not read them before, I hope you get something from reading them.  If you have, I believe rereading is always a good thing.  Once you read, please connect with me and share your thoughts.

Now let’s step onward in this new journey together.