Day 3 – Differentiated Instruction: Observable Improvement for My Evaluation

Let me get right to it. I need to improve in the area of differentiated instruction. I could make a list of excuses for why I have not moved beyond proficient in this area but that does nothing to improve my teaching practices. Nor does it help me correctly focus my attention.

Much like differentiated instruction improves all student learning, we need to differentiate how we approach this instruction practice for teachers themselves. Differentiated professional development is essential to model quality instruction. But teachers need to take it upon themselves to seek information sources, supportive and challenging peers, and good observable examples for differentiated instruction.

So I am putting myself out there right here and now. I want to hear from other teachers, especially specialists (librarians, art, music, PE teachers, etc.), how you differentiate for student learning.

Also, I am searching online. Edutopia is an excellent go-to source for almost all topics relating to education. I found this remarkable slide share showing 18 strategies for differentiating instruction. Nothing is new or earth shattering. After all the research, professional development, staff meetings, and conversations I’ve had over my career, I will be hard pressed to find some brand new idea around differentiation. But I continue to learn and put into practice what I am learning. Lina Raffelli’s 18 strategies post is excellent and great page to keep handy.

When I look at my observation feedback and evaluation rubric, I always get a gut punch when I look at the differentiation check mark. I know that I am differentiating my instruction. At least, I feel like. Doesn’t that mean it’s happening? Of course it doesn’t. If my observers are looking for it and only find a proficient level of differentiating, I need to improve. I need to grow. I will.

By the way, I know I have an unannounced observation coming up soon. I better be prepared. Not just because I want to rate distinguished on a rubric. I need to do better because, borrowing the phrase from an awesome educators support and inspiration source, my “KIDS DESERVE IT”.