30 Day Challenge—Day 1: Start Blogging

By now, I hope it’s fairly evident that I intend to blog as a form of reflective writing. I always have good intentions to start this blog but I allow excuses for why I should not. Back in November 2016, my school district, Wake County Public School System, hosted its semi-annual Convergence conference. This conference is the district’s professional development for instructional technology and library media staff. Modeled after state and national technology conferences, Convergence hosts two days of congruent sessions bookended by keynote speakers. Each Convergence is structured through a theme. This most recent Convergence focused on innovation. Kevin Brookhouser and George Couros were the opening and closing keynote speakers respectively. Brookhouser* spoke about 20Time Project and Couros* The Innovator’s Mindset. Each keynote session was truly inspiring.

Each keynote speaker also let some congruent sessions. Due to timing of other sessions, I did not attend any of Mr. Brookhouser’s sessions. However, I did go to one of the three sessions Mr. Couros presented. It was on blogging as form of professional portfolios. I left the session knowing I needed to blog but not sure where or how to start. The session was both inspiring and overwhelming. Writing is fairly easy for me. As a librarian, organizing a blog is easy. But knowing what to say or if what I have to say makes a difference is more challenging for me. My understanding of Couros’ view of blogging is “you’re already doing this stuff inside and outside the classroom, just put it down in a digital footprint.”

Of course that is an overly simplistic view of his session and much more “plainly spoken” than what I took away from the session. Blogging is important. But more important than leaving a digital footprint is reflecting on my instructional practice. I believe that is the key to blogging as Couros sees it. As a National Board Certified Teacher (NBTC), I know how important reflection is on my daily instruction and student learning. I know why I must be systematic in my blogging. And I believe I put a lot of pressure on myself to make my blog/portfolio “good enough”.

In the past, and for the most part, I still do, I have viewed reflective writing as a dairy, as something for me to put my thoughts just for me. When writing for NBPTS (National Board for Professional Teaching Standards) and for graduate school, I framed my instructional reflections for a particular audience. Blog audiences are more varied. Am I writing for other teachers to learn from me? Am I writing in hopes of making connections and learning from others? Am I writing for future administrators as I advance my career? The answer is yes to all. So where do I start? I start by writing for myself. I apologize in advance if my writing takes a more direct or conversational tone at times. When I write for myself, I always read it aloud to myself as if I am presenting to an audience of one. I listen for the natural pauses and ponder when something profound is says. It may seem weird to some people, but I bet if you try it, you will understand why I do it. So this blog is for all the readers out there. But at the core, it is for me.

Because of the many audiences and because it’s for me, there are so many directions I can take this blog/portfolio. There are so many journeys I want to pursue over the next chapters of my career. But I need to start by first putting word to print. I need to make writing in this blog a habitual practice.

I decided to search for how to form a habit and came across this article. For me, it presents too many steps but I believe it’s designed for broad appeal. I have read and reread the ones I think are most applicable to this journey and me. Therefore, I’m committing to 30 days of daily blogging. Furthermore, I found a 30-day blogging challenge for teachers. I like its approach and guidance. I plan to use it as training wheels.

Day 1’s challenge is to write a goal for this school year. My goal for now is to blog as a form of reflection. I will do my best over the next 30 days to connect both the day’s writing challenge to my thoughts of a lesson or takeaway from something happening at school. But most importantly, I plan to write each day. For it to be a habit, I have to start. To make a digital footprint, I have to step. This is that starting step.

*Do yourself a BIG favor! Follow their blogs, Twitter feeds, thought patterns. These two are truly innovative and changing the way other’s view education in the modern era.

 

Welcome to the new site

My blog is back up and running and on a new site. New Adventures of an Old Librarian

Hello and welcome to the new site rickydhamilton.com.  Last year, I started a blog on blogspot and enjoyed when I wrote.  But, I rarely gave myself time to do it.  After a few weeks of not posting, I thought, “Why bother?  No one is reading anymore anyway.”  But November 2016, I was fortunate enough to sit in a conference session by the one and only (and totally amazing…I’m geeking out here, just so you know) George Couros.  The session focused on blogging as form of professional portfolio.

This session challenged me in a way I had not anticipated.  Honestly, I thought I would enjoy hearing from him.  I have followed him on Twitter for years. I truly was going to the session as a fan an less as a learner.  Now before you skewer me for attending a conference and not opening myself as a learner please understand I value cognitive breaks.  As a teacher and librarian, I am focuseimg_0510d on instructing all day.  My learning muscles are not as sharp as they were when I spent my whole day in school as a learner.  So after attending a previous full day of attending sessions, taking notes, and devouring as much learning as possible, by day two I was a bit tired.  But I entered a packed room and found one empty chair I rushed to claim as mine so I could sit and be mesmerized by an edchat guru.

Instead of being mesmerized by his knowledge, I was dumbfounded by my lack of blogging; my lack of reflective writing; my lack of proving my passion.  I left his session wanting and needing to write.  But I did not.  I have sat on this for upwards of two months.

Why?  Because I was not ready.  Why? Because I was holding myself back.  Why? Because I felt inferior to those around me.  I allowed myself to forget how to correctly #failforward. And I have felt ashamed because I have kept myself from stepping out on a limb.  If I truly believe and want and demand that my students take risks, I have to as well.  So, here it is.  I’m back baby!  I have a lot to say and I hope others will learn from it.  But more importantly, I hope others will continue to push me, challenge me, and help teach me so I can continue to grow as a learner.

The next few posts are copies of the 4 posts from blogspot.  If you have not read them before, I hope you get something from reading them.  If you have, I believe rereading is always a good thing.  Once you read, please connect with me and share your thoughts.

Now let’s step onward in this new journey together.