Rosie Revere, Engineer…It’s a Boy Book Too!

Books should not be labeled.   This is not about categorizing for easy access; it is about defining books by who should read them. Teachers, parents, librarians, booksellers, and publishers are all at fault. I am guilty too. I have labeled a book a “boy book” or a “book perfect for girls.” I have said that is a “older book” or “book just for Kindergarteners”.

Each label assigned to a book limits the audience.   This limits a connection between the book and a potential reader who does not fit the assigned label. Rosie Revere, Engineer written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts is a perfect example. The main character, Rosie, is a young girl. She is a dreamer, innovator, and engineer. Because a family member laughed at one of her inventions, she builds in secret hiding her talent. Through the love, guidance, and even laughter from another family member, she learns that failure is good because it leads to success. She comes out of hiding as an engineer and creates openly once again.

Tonight, my preschool aged son asked to read this book at bedtime. He clapped and giggled at each invention. When Rosie began to build in secret he was upset. As she built her cheese-helicopter (Really, you need to read this book. It has a cheese-helicopter!), he smiled in anticipation.   It flew, then wobbled, and then fell to the ground.  My son cheered!  He screamed, “It flew!” After Rosie learned it was ok to fail but keep going, my son yelled, “She’s awesome!”

we_can_do_it_3678696585If I prescribed to labels, this would be a “girl book.” With a main character paying homage to the iconic character Rosie the Riveter, this book is not a natural pick up for boys. With its rhyming cadence and relatively large font, most upper elementary students would not read this book. But this book is for everyone! The story is about failing forward. It’s about preserving even when you are down on yourself or when others mock you.   It’s about seeing everyday objects for unintended purposes.

In light of political movements gaining much needed attention, we need to be careful when labeling books. Books are for everyone. Rosie’s story is applicable to us all. So are the many other books on shelves to which we try to attach unnecessary labels. Recently, I have been trying to begin my book talks by identifying a character’s trait rather than the character’s gender or age. I believe students are more inclined to try a book about someone who does not look like them when they can identify with the trait first.

After all, Rosie Revere, Engineer is a “boy book” too!